Thursday, May 3, 2018

English Honors 9 The Possibility of Evil Notes 04/30/18 • Today’s assignment for Euro Lit: o Read the Jung packet, pages 1-6. o Study Jung vocabulary for a fifty-point quiz on Monday. o Bring your student ID and return Jane Eyre on Monday. • Today’s assignment for Honors 9: o Prewrite your The Possibility of Evil essay. o Bring only your story! • How did the story make us feel? o We felt unsettled by Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence being revealed as an evil person. o We felt upset that Strangeworth turned out to be evil. o We feel that Strangeworth got what she deserved, and we feel satisfied by the townsfolk getting revenge on Strangeworth. o We feel disturbed that Strangeworth thinks her letters are helping the town improved. • How did the author make us feel that? o We start by liking Miss Strangeworth in the beginning, similar to how we pity Markwardt in the beginning of The Man Who Had No Eyes. • We are ignorant of the evil within Miss Strangeworth, but are shown how Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence hides her evil from plain view. • What changes? o Our perspective on Miss Strangeworth changes. o Our perspective of the town changes. o Our perspective on ourselves changes. o Our perception on our ability to surpass our inherent evil. • What makes it change? o When Miss Strangeworth writes the letter to Helen Crane saying “didn’t you ever see an idiot child before?”(199). • Strangeworth writes the letters, because “as long as evil” exists in the world, Strangeworth will write her letters to make the world less evil. Or does she? • Miss Strangeworth could be bitter, possibly out of loneliness. “… Had stopped calling him Tommy and started calling him Mr. Lewis”(196). o Strangeworth has become more aloof and separated from the townspeople. • Miss Strangeworth gets satisfaction out of writing her letters, and puts up a façade of innocence in order to be liked. o Strangeworth knows she isn’t writing the letters to help people, because she “had always made a point of mailing her letters very secretly”. o Miss Strangeworth locks her drawer to keep her letters secret. o Strangeworth uses a different type of paper when writing her “other letters”. • Strangeworth is a perfectionist, and she “hated sloppiness” that she sees. o Strangeworth wants to keep the town in her own version of perfection. • By writing the letters, how does she help the town? • Strangeworth is only putting evil into the town instead of fighting evil… • By pointing out the evil in other vulnerable people, Strangeworth inflates her own opinion of herself because she doesn’t share those flaws. • Strangeworth writes the letters to hurt Helen Crane. • Strangeworth is “happy with her letters” • Strangeworth “liked writing her letters”(200). • Miss Strangeworth sees herself as superior, sometimes “thinking that the town belonged to her”(196). • “Strangeworth’s little town… Watched my little town grow…”(196). • “As long as evil existed in this world…” • “There wouldn’t have been a town here if it weren’t for my grandfather…” • “This was, after all, her town… Her people…”(202) • Strangeworth goes to great lengths to keep her letters from being seen; because she knows what she is doing is evil. • “She would burn it at once”(199), “Unlock”(198), “Printed them in a childish block print”(), “dull stub of a pencil”(), “Locking… house”(201), “timed her walk perfectly…”(201), the blue paper. • Strangeworth knows the letters are evil, and that “her name, a name honored… did not belong on such trash”(200). • “Harsh, perhaps. But wickedness was never easily banished… A clean heart was a scoured heart”(203). o Strangeworth is intentionally lying to the townsfolk, thinking that she is cleaning the hearts of the townsfolk. o Strangeworth thinks that she is helping to improve the town by writing her letters. o Strangeworth feels entitled to the town, and she feels that she should be thanked for her actions towards the town, pitying herself in the end because she doesn’t think she is evil. • Strangeworth does not see herself as evil, even if her letters are. o Page 203: “cried… at the wickedness of the world…” • Miss Strangeworth feels entitled to being able to write the evil letters. o Strangeworth justifies her actions with a Machiavellian attitude: The end justifies the means. o We feel satisfied that the town took revenge on Miss Strangeworth for writing the letters, which then makes us see the evil within ourselves. • Point of view: o Third-person omniscient (information given is reliable) • The narrator gives us information that is reliable to Miss Strangeworth’s perception. • In what way does it change? o We go from seeing Miss Strangeworth as an innocent woman who walks “daintily along Main Street” to seeing her as an evil, cruel old woman. o The third-person omniscient narrator withholds certain information in order to obscure Miss Strangeworth’s evil nature in the beginning of the story. o We find out that we have the possibility of evil within ourselves as well. • Plot: o Protagonist: Strangeworth, trying to eradicate the evil of the town • Strangeworth writes the letters to rid the town of evil; ironically, the letters themselves spread evil in the town. o Antagonist: The townspeople o Setting: anywhere, on a beautiful summer’s day on Pleasant Street. • Strangeworth has been writing her letters “for the past year”(200). o Internal conflict question: Can Miss Strangeworth stop the evil in herself and stop writing the letters? o External conflict question: Can Miss Strangeworth rid the town of evil? o Climax: “haven’t you ever seen an idiot child before?” • Strangeworth does not successfully resolve her internal conflict question, as shown by her crying “at the wickedness of the world”. • The town’s evil is not eradicated: the roses are all cut by the townspeople. o Denouement: The realization of our own evil and schadenfreude. • With self-consciousness, we realize that we have the possibility of evil within us, but we also realize that we are capable of surpassing the knee-jerk reaction of schadenfreude. • Diction: o The “dainty” walk of Miss Strangeworth goes from being a positive image in the beginning of the story to an indicator of Strangeworth’s evil and how appearances can be deceiving. o Page 197: “She thought indulgently…” • Strangeworth is casting a condescending judgment onto Don and Helen Crane. o Page 197: “Dryly” shows how Miss Strangeworth is judgmental towards the others in town. o “Besides” understates how Miss Strangeworth enjoys writing her letters. o Page 200: “If there had been…” shows that Strangeworth makes up the content of her letters, and shows how evil she is. o Miss Strangeworth “never” concerns herself with facts, and she makes it “all” up when writing her letters. o “Possibility” is the most important word in the story, • Symbolism: o Miss Strangeworth: Evil • Strangeworth writes the letters, and she “liked writing her letters”. • “She was pleased with the letter”(199). o The Harris boy symbolizes how we have the possibility of kindness as well. o Page 202: The falling of the third letter without Strangeworth noticing symbolizes how Strangeworth is so blinded by her own evil that she cannot see what she is doing. • The mistake demonstrates how Strangeworth is vulnerable to human error despite thinking herself better than other people. • Strangeworth is so confident that she can control everything, but overlooks the letter being dropped. o The town cutting the roses down is a symbol of… o The letters o Strangeworth having had a long time before knowing the names of all the kids in town symbolizes her absence of love for the town she thinks she owns. o The roses symbolize how seemingly beautiful things can have hidden dangers and hidden evil that are not known until those dangers hurt us. • We all have the possibility of evil within ourselves. No one is exempt from that possibility. • Mood/tone/atmosphere: o Mood: Ironic o Tone: Ironic • Irony: o Miss Strangeworth lives on Pleasant Street, which isn’t very pleasant. • An example of situational irony in the story. o The townspeople seem so nice, but turn out to be evil as well. o The day is a beautiful summer day, but the day itself is not pleasant at all. o Miss Strangeworth is feeling sorry for herself for the town doing what she has done to them, but does not see her self as evil for writing her letters. o The Harris boy is trying to do a good deed by picking up Miss Strangeworth’s letter, but ends up causing more evil to spread. • The Harris boy may have been involved in the destruction of the roses as well, doing an evil act even though he seemed to want to do good by doing good acts. o The townspeople are trying to do a good thing for the town by cutting down Strangeworth’s roses, but are only stimulating the evil within Miss Strangeworth and the town as a whole. • The town may have enjoyed the act of destroying the roses as well, similar to our enjoyment of Strangeworth’s pain at finding her roses destroyed. o Trying to rid evil, but causing the evil to spread. o Strangeworth grows roses, a symbol of love, but is evil and does not seem to love many things other than her self. o Strangeworth’s face is soft, but her letters are harsh and sharp. • Strangeworth has been writing a huge amount of her “other letters”, as she is “down to the blue already” (199). o The amount of letters Strangeworth has written shows just how evil she really is. • Theme: We all have the possibility of evil within ourselves. o Alternate themes you may write about: • Appearances can be deceiving. • Don’t take revenge on others. “What goes around comes around.” “Two wrongs don’t make a right” “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.” • Conclusion paragraph: o Can compare to the story of The Lottery. o Hobbes (humans are born in a dog-eat-dog world) vs. Rousseau (humans are born inherently good). • The Lottery: o The crowd first seems to be friendly with everyone, but when the evil in the town is directed at someone, that person suddenly cries out in protest despite being all for the lottery at first. o The town could be any town. o The lottery is a tradition, revered by the town and done for generations. o The lottery is a ritual that takes place right at the end of spring. o The lottery is given up in some places, indicating that the lottery is not a necessary event. o Tessie drew the paper with the black spot, and is then stoned by the crowd around her. o Tessie’s close friends do not hesitate and are even eager to stone Tessie to death. o The crowd’s herd mentality compels them to continue to kill Tessie. o The lottery was done in ancient Greece with white and black stones. • The story is a moral allegory of the inner evil in humanity. • The Harris boy is a positive and negative representation of the theme by acting out of kindness to deliver the letter but also contributing to the evil in the town by revealing Strangeworth as the writer of the letter. o Page 203: “Why do anyone a favor… Maybe they need…” o The Harris boy is trying to undo evil through kindness, but ironically ends up causing the roses to be cut by the town. • “Never aware of possible evil…” could indicate that Miss Strangeworth has positive intentions in writing her letters. • “Miss Strangeworth would have been… shocked if there was anything going on…” o Miss Strangeworth is intentionally lying to the people she writes to in her letters. • Page 203: The “intense…” happiness that Miss Strangeworth experiences shows that the possibility of evil is part of human nature, and that we derive pleasure from pain. Humanity has schadenfreude; a feeling of pleasure derived from observing other’s pain. o If Strangeworth truly wanted to improve the town, she would have spread kindness. Instead, she writes the letters because the pain caused by the townspeople’s pain creates an “intense” feeling of pleasure within Strangeworth. o Sadism is the joy of inflicting pain on others, and Miss Strangeworth displays sadism by spreading false rumors that harm the townspeople to further her intense pleasure. o Page 202: “You’ve got to have a dirty, dirty mind…” • Previous president Richard Nixon admitted to orchestrating Watergate, because according to him, it wasn’t against the law. o We have the mentality that an evil action that we know is evil is somehow not evil if we commit the act. o We feel that we have an entitlement to committing an evil action without being evil. • The story is ridiculing an aspect of human society and/or behavior with intent to improve. What is that aspect? o The satiric target of The Possibility of Evil must be answered in your thesis statement. • If you are going to be talking about schadenfreude, you should define the term in the intro paragraph.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

English Honors 9 The Possibility of Evil Notes 04/30/18 • Today’s assignment for Euro Lit: o Finish “Jayne Eyre”! o Answer the study guide questions for Hagel’s “Lordship and Bondage” (due Thursday). • Today’s assignment for Honors 9: o Re-read The Possibility of Evil. o Prewrite your essay as needed after checking the blog notes below and fleshing out your own notes. • How did the story make us feel? o We felt unsettled by Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence being revealed as an evil person. o We felt upset that Strangeworth turned out to be evil. o We feel that Strangeworth got what she deserved, and we feel satisfied by the townsfolk getting revenge on Strangeworth. o We feel disturbed that Strangeworth thinks her letters are helping the town improved. • How did the author make us feel that? o We start by liking Miss Strangeworth in the beginning, similar to how we pity Markwardt in the beginning of The Man Who Had No Eyes. • We are ignorant of the evil within Miss Strangeworth, but are shown how Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence hides her evil from plain view. • What changes? o Our perspective on Miss Strangeworth changes. o Our perspective of the town changes. o Our perspective on ourselves changes. • What makes it change? o When Miss Strangeworth writes the letter to Helen Crane saying “didn’t you ever see an idiot child before?”(199). • Strangeworth writes the letters, because “as long as evil” exists in the world, Strangeworth will write her letters to make the world less evil. Or does she? • Miss Strangeworth could be bitter, possibly out of loneliness. “… Had stopped calling him Tommy and started calling him Mr. Lewis”(196). o Strangeworth has become more aloof and separated from the townspeople. • Miss Strangeworth gets satisfaction out of writing her letters, and puts up a façade of innocence in order to be liked. o Strangeworth knows she isn’t writing the letters to help people, because she “had always made a point of mailing her letters very secretly”. o Miss Strangeworth locks her drawer to keep her letters secret. o Strangeworth uses a different type of paper when writing her “other letters”. • Strangeworth is a perfectionist, and she “hated sloppiness” that she sees. o Strangeworth wants to keep the town in her own version of perfection. • By writing the letters, how does she help the town? • Strangeworth is only putting evil into the town instead of fighting evil… • By pointing out the evil in other vulnerable people, Strangeworth inflates her own opinion of herself because she doesn’t share those flaws. • Strangeworth writes the letters to hurt Helen Crane. • Strangeworth is “happy with her letters” • Strangeworth “liked writing her letters”(200). • Miss Strangeworth sees herself as superior, sometimes “thinking that the town belonged to her”(196). • “Strangeworth’s little town… Watched my little town grow…”(196). • “As long as evil existed in this world…” • “There wouldn’t have been a town here if it weren’t for my grandfather…” • Strangeworth goes to great lengths to keep her letters from being seen; because she knows what she is doing is evil. • “She would burn it at once”(199), “Unlock”(198), “Printed them in a childish block print”(), “dull stub of a pencil”(), “Locking… house”(201), “timed her walk perfectly…”(201), the blue paper. • Strangeworth knows the letters are evil, and that “her name, a name honored… did not belong on such trash”(200). • “Harsh, perhaps. But wickedness was never easily banished… A clean heart was a scoured heart”(203). o Strangeworth is intentionally lying to the townsfolk, thinking that she is cleaning the hearts of the townsfolk. o Strangeworth thinks that she is helping to improve the town by writing her letters. o Strangeworth feels entitled to the town, and she feels that she should be thanked for her actions towards the town, pitying herself in the end because she doesn’t think she is evil. • Strangeworth does not see herself as evil, even if her letters are. o Page 203: “cried… at the wickedness of the world…” • Miss Strangeworth feels entitled to being able to write the evil letters. o Strangeworth justifies her actions with a Machiavellian attitude: The end justifies the means. o We feel satisfied that the town took revenge on Miss Strangeworth for writing the letters, which then makes us see the evil within ourselves. • Point of view: o Third-person omniscient (information given is reliable) • The narrator gives us information that is reliable to Miss Strangeworth’s perception. • In what way does it change? o We go from seeing Miss Strangeworth as an innocent woman who walks “daintily along Main Street” to seeing her as an evil, cruel old woman. o The third-person omniscient narrator withholds certain information in order to obscure Miss Strangeworth’s evil nature in the beginning of the story. o We find out that we have the possibility of evil within ourselves as well. • Plot: o Protagonist: Strangeworth, trying to eradicate the evil of the town • Strangeworth writes the letters to rid the town of evil; ironically, the letters themselves spread evil in the town. o Antagonist: The townspeople o Setting: anywhere, on a beautiful summer’s day on Pleasant Street. • Strangeworth has been writing her letters “for the past year”(200). o Internal conflict question: Can Miss Strangeworth stop the evil in herself and stop writing the letters? o External conflict question: Can Miss Strangeworth rid the town of evil? o Climax: “haven’t you ever seen an idiot child before?” • Strangeworth does not successfully resolve her internal conflict question, as shown by her crying “at the wickedness of the world”. • The town’s evil is not eradicated: the roses are all cut by the townspeople. o Denouement: The realization of our own evil and schadenfreude. • Diction: o The “dainty” walk of Miss Strangeworth goes from being a positive image in the beginning of the story to an indicator of Strangeworth’s evil and how appearances can be deceiving. o Page 197: “She thought indulgently…” • Strangeworth is casting a condescending judgment onto Don and Helen Crane. o Page 197: “Dryly” shows how Miss Strangeworth is judgmental towards the others in town. • Symbolism: o Miss Strangeworth: Evil • Strangeworth writes the letters, and she “liked writing her letters”. • “She was pleased with the letter”(199). o Page 202: The falling of the third letter without Strangeworth noticing symbolizes how Strangeworth is so blinded by her own evil that she cannot see what she is doing. • The mistake demonstrates how Strangeworth is vulnerable to human error despite thinking herself better than other people. • Strangeworth is so confident that she can control everything, but overlooks the letter being dropped. • We all have the possibility of evil within ourselves. No one is exempt from that possibility. • Irony: o Miss Strangeworth lives on Pleasant Street, which isn’t very pleasant. • An example of situational irony in the story.’ o The townspeople seem so nice, but turn out to be evil as well. o The day is a beautiful summer day, but the day itself is not pleasant at all. o • Strangeworth has been writing a huge amount of her “other letters”, as she is “down to the blue already” (199). o The amount of letters Strangeworth has written shows just how evil she really is. • Theme: o Appearances can be deceiving. o Don’t take revenge on others. “What goes around comes around.” “Two wrongs don’t make a right” “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.” • The story is a moral allegory of the inner evil in humanity. • The Harris boy is a positive and negative representation of the theme by acting out of kindness to deliver the letter but also contributing to the evil in the town by revealing Strangeworth as the writer of the letter. o Page 203: “Why do anyone a favor… Maybe they need…” o The Harris boy is trying to undo evil through kindness, but ironically ends up causing the roses to be cut by the town. • “Never aware of possible evil…” could indicate that Miss Strangeworth has positive intentions in writing her letters. • “Miss Strangeworth would have been… shocked if there was anything going on…” o Miss Strangeworth is intentionally lying to the people she writes to in her letters. • Page 203: The “intense…” happiness that Miss Strangeworth experiences shows that the possibility of evil is part of human nature, and that we derive pleasure from pain. Humanity has schadenfreude; a feeling of pleasure derived from observing other’s pain. • Previous president Richard Nixon admitted to orchestrating Watergate, because according to him, it wasn’t against the law. o We have the mentality that an evil action that we know is evil is somehow not evil if we commit the act. o We feel that we have an entitlement to committing an evil action without being evil. • The story is ridiculing an aspect of human society and/or behavior with intent to improve. What is that aspect?

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

English Honors 9 The Possibility of Evil Notes 04/30/18 • Today’s assignment for Euro Lit: o Finish “Jayne Eyre”! o Answer the study guide questions for Hagel’s “Lordship and Bondage” (due Thursday). • Today’s assignment for Honors 9: o Re-read The Possibility of Evil. o Prewrite your essay as needed after checking the blog notes below and fleshing out your own notes. • How did the story make us feel? o We felt unsettled by Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence being revealed as an evil person. o We felt upset that Strangeworth turned out to be evil. o We feel that Strangeworth got what she deserved, and we feel satisfied by the townsfolk getting revenge on Strangeworth. o We feel disturbed that Strangeworth thinks her letters are helping the town improved. • How did the author make us feel that? o We start by liking Miss Strangeworth in the beginning, similar to how we pity Markwardt in the beginning of The Man Who Had No Eyes. • We are ignorant of the evil within Miss Strangeworth, but are shown how Miss Strangeworth’s seeming innocence hides her evil from plain view. • What changes? o Our perspective on Miss Strangeworth changes. o Our perspective of the town changes. o Our perspective on ourselves changes. • What makes it change? o When Miss Strangeworth writes the letter to Helen Crane saying “didn’t you ever see an idiot child before?”(199). • Strangeworth writes the letters, because “as long as evil” exists in the world, Strangeworth will write her letters to make the world less evil. Or does she? • Miss Strangeworth could be bitter, possibly out of loneliness. “… Had stopped calling him Tommy and started calling him Mr. Lewis”(196). o Strangeworth has become more aloof and separated from the townspeople. • Miss Strangeworth gets satisfaction out of writing her letters, and puts up a façade of innocence in order to be liked. o Strangeworth knows she isn’t writing the letters to help people, because she “had always made a point of mailing her letters very secretly”. o Miss Strangeworth locks her drawer to keep her letters secret. o Strangeworth uses a different type of paper when writing her “other letters”. • Strangeworth is a perfectionist, and she “hated sloppiness” that she sees. o Strangeworth wants to keep the town in her own version of perfection. • By writing the letters, how does she help the town? • Strangeworth is only putting evil into the town instead of fighting evil… • By pointing out the evil in other vulnerable people, Strangeworth inflates her own opinion of herself because she doesn’t share those flaws. • Strangeworth writes the letters to hurt Helen Crane. • Strangeworth is “happy with her letters” and is not • Strangeworth “liked writing her letters”(200). • Miss Strangeworth sees herself as superior, sometimes “thinking that the town belonged to her”(196). • “Strangeworth’s little town… Watched my little town grow…”(196). • “As long as evil existed in this world…” • “There wouldn’t have been a town here if it weren’t for my grandfather…” • Strangeworth goes to great lengths to keep her letters from being seen; because she knows what she is doing is evil. • “She would burn it at once”(199), “Unlock”(198), “Printed them in a childish block print”(), “dull stub of a pencil”(), “Locking… house”(201), “timed her walk perfectly…”(201), the blue paper. • Strangeworth knows the letters are evil, and that “her name, a name honored… did not belong on such trash”(200). • “Harsh, perhaps. But wickedness was never easily banished…”(203). o Strangeworth thinks that she is helping to improve the town by writing her letters. o Strangeworth feels entitled to the town, and she feels that she should be thanked for her actions towards the town, pitying herself in the end because she doesn’t think she is evil. o Strangeworth begins to “cry silently for the wickedness of the world”. • Strangeworth does not see herself as evil, even if her letters are. • Miss Strangeworth feels entitled… o The town fights fire with fire against Miss Strangeworth, as they destroy her roses out of anger toward her writing the letters. • The town finds out about the letters because Strangeworth’s third letter “caught onto the edge” of the mailbox and falls to the ground to be found by the Harris boy. o We feel satisfied that the town took revenge on Miss Strangeworth for writing the letters, which then makes us see the evil within ourselves. • Point of view: o Third-person omniscient (information given is reliable) • “Daintily” is a subjective term, hinting that the information presented by the narrator is reliable to the perception of Strangeworth. • “Daintily” and “pretty” create an image of Miss Strangeworth as an innocent old woman in the reader’s mind. • In what way does it change? o We go from seeing Miss Strangeworth as an innocent woman who walks “daintily along Main Street” to seeing her as an evil, cruel old woman. o The third-person omniscient narrator withholds certain information in order to obscure Miss Strangeworth’s evil nature in the beginning of the story. o We find out that we have the possibility of evil within ourselves as well. • Plot: o Protagonist: Strangeworth, trying to eradicate the evil of the town o Antagonist: The townspeople o Setting; anywhere, on a beautiful summer’s day in Pleasant Street. o Exposition: • Mr. Lewis “looked worried” • Mrs. Harper seems unsettled. • Helen Crane is worried about her child. • Miss Chandler “seemed absentminded”. • “Many people seemed disturbed recently”. • The townspeople are worried because of Miss Strangeworth’s letters, but we do not know of the existence of the letters. • Diction: o The “dainty” walk of Miss Strangeworth goes from being a positive image in the beginning of the story to an indicator of Strangeworth’s evil and how appearances can be deceiving. • Symbolism: o Miss Strangeworth: Evil o Page 202: The falling of the third letter without Strangeworth noticing symbolizes how Strangeworth is so blinded by her own evil that she cannot see what she is doing. • The mistake demonstrates how Strangeworth is vulnerable to human error despite thinking herself better than other people. • We all have the possibility of evil within ourselves. No one is exempt from that possibility. • Irony: o Miss Strangeworth lives on Pleasant Street, which isn’t very pleasant. • An example of situational irony in the story.’ o The townspeople seem so nice, but turn out to be evil as well. o The day is a beautiful summer day, but the day itself is not pleasant at all. • Strangeworth has been writing a huge amount of her “other letters”, as she is “down to the blue already” (199). o The amount of letters Strangeworth has written shows just how evil she really is. • Theme: o Appearances can be deceiving. o Don’t take revenge on others. “What goes around comes around.” “Two wrongs don’t make a right” “An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.”